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Healthy Eating

Sushi is becoming one of the world’s most popular foods, mostly seen in celebrity diets and healthy eating magazines. This is for a good reason, Sushi is considered as one of the explanations for why Japanese people have the longest life expectancy in the world. Sushi contains many healthy ingredients such as fibre, vitamins, protein and omega-3.

Omega-3 is particularly significant as it is found in fish and has been proven to reduce heart disease. The natural fish oils also help reduce spots and keep your skin smooth and glowing.

One of the best things about sushi is the ingredients are natural; there are no colourings, preservatives and almost no saturated fat. This is why sushi is taking over the sandwich and is now a main stream food type.

Here at Sakushi our motto is a piece of sushi a day keeps the doctor away!


Friday 16th

Sakushi Launch Website
Here at Sakushi we like to give you something different, fresh and new. So we've been working to bring you a new look website - with a bit more style than the last one. So if you like your websites hand crafted - just like our sushi, then we hope you'll enjoy the new look site.
Thursday 15th

About Sushi
The original type of sushi, known today as nare-zushi (馴れ寿司, 熟寿司) was first developed in Southeast Asia possibly along what is now known as the Mekong River and then spread to southern China before introduction to Japan.[citation needed] The term sushi comes from an archaic grammatical form no longer used in other contexts; literally, sushi means "sour-tasting", a reflection of its historic fermented roots. The oldest form of sushi in Japan, narezushi, still very closely resembles this process, wherein fish is fermented via being wrapped in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins break down via fermentation into its constituent amino acids. The fermenting rice and fish results in a sour taste and also one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese.[1] In Japan, narezushi evolved into oshizushi and ultimately Edomae nigirizushi, which is what the world today knows as "sushi".

Contemporary Japanese sushi has little resemblance to the traditional lacto-fermented rice dish. Originally, when the fermented fish was taken out of the rice, only the fish was consumed and the fermented rice was discarded.[2] The strong-tasting and smelling funazushi, a kind of narezushi made near Lake Biwa in Japan, resembles the traditional fermented dish. Beginning in the Muromachi period (AD 1336–1573) of Japan, vinegar was added to the mixture for better taste and preservation. The vinegar accentuated the rice's sourness and was known to increase its shelf life, allowing the fermentation process to be shortened and eventually abandoned. In the following centuries, sushi in Osaka evolved into oshi-zushi. The seafood and rice were pressed using wooden (usually bamboo) molds. By the mid 18th century, this form of sushi had reached Edo (contemporary Tokyo).[3]

The contemporary version, internationally known as "sushi", was created by Hanaya Yohei (1799–1858) at the end of the Edo period in Edo. The sushi invented by Hanaya was an early form of fast food that was not fermented (therefore prepared quickly) and could be eaten with one's hands at a roadside or in a theatre.[3] Originally, this sushi was known as Edomae zushi because it used freshly caught fish in the Edo-mae (Edo Bay or Tokyo Bay). Though the fish used in modern sushi no longer usually comes from Tokyo Bay, it is still formally known as Edomae nigirizushi.


Sunday 1st

Site Links


© August 17, 2017

Website Design:
Nixin Design
Opening Times
Dining in
Monday to Thur 12-10pm, Friday to Saturday 12-10.30, Sunday 9.30pm
Takeaway Collection

Monday to Sat 12-10.30pm, Sunday 12-10pm
Takeaway Delivery
Monday to Friday 5-10.30pm, Saturday 12-10.30pm,
Sunday 12-10pm

About Sakushi Sushi restaurant

We do Japanese food! Sushi from the belt, a big bowl of ramen noodles, appetising Japanese starters, mixed bento boxes and fresh Sashimi to order.

We had Sheffield's first Sushi train and set up our shop on Campo lane - a splash of soya from West Street and Sheffield Fargate. Don't get in a ginger pickle though, eat as much (or as little) as you like at our restaurant - our sushi belt brings you instant sushi goodness.

We can cater for romantic couples, parties or groups - so what are you waiting for?
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